Übersicht aller jüdischer Nobelpreisträger

Physiknobelpreis

  • Alexei Alexeevich Abrikosov, Russia, for pioneering contributions to the theory of superconductors and superfluids (Jewish mother)
  • Zhores Alferov, Russia, (Jewish mother)
  • Hans Bethe, US, (Jewish mother)
  • Felix Bloch, Swiss and US, for his development of new methods for nuclear magnetic precision measurements and discoveries in connection therewith
  • Niels Bohr, Denmark, for his quantum model of the atom (Jewish mother)
  • Max Born, Germany, UK and US, for his fundamental research in quantum mechanics, especially for his statistical interpretation of the wavefunction
  • Georges Charpak, France
  • Claude Cohen-Tannoudji, France,(Tunisian-Jewish parents)
  • Leon Neil Cooper, US,
  • Albert Einstein, German, later US, for theory of the photoelectric effect
  • Richard P. Feynman, US, for their fundamental work in quantum electrodynamics, with deep-ploughing consequences for the physics of elementary particles (Even though he has Jewish ancestry, he refused to be included in a list of "Jewish Nobel laureates" and "Jewish scientists" [1].)
  • James Franck, Germany, for their discovery of the laws governing the impact of an electron upon an atom
  • Ilya Frank, Russia, (Jewish father)
  • Jerome Isaac Friedman, US, for their pioneering investigations concerning deep inelastic scattering of electrons on protons and bound neutrons, which have been of essential importance for the development of the quark model in particle physics
  • Dennis Gabor, Hungary, for his invention and development of the holographic method
  • Murray Gell-Mann, US, for his contributions and discoveries concerning the classification of elementary particles and their interactions"
  • Vitaly Lazarevich Ginzburg, Russia, for pioneering contributions to the theory of superconductors and superfluids
  • Donald Arthur Glaser, US, for the invention of the bubble chamber
  • Sheldon Lee Glashow, US, for their contributions to the theory of the unified weak and electromagnetic interaction between elementary particles, including, inter alia, the prediction of the weak neutral current
  • Roy Glauber, U.S. physicist, Nobel Prize (2005)
  • David Gross, US, for the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction
  • Robert Hofstadter, US, for his pioneering studies of electron scattering in atomic nuclei and for his thereby achieved discoveries concerning the structure of the nucleons
  • Brian David Josephson, UK, for his theoretical predictions of the properties of a supercurrent through a tunnel barrier, in particular those phenomena which are generally known as the Josephson effect
  • Lev Davidovich Landau, Russia, for his pioneering theories for condensed matter, especially liquid helium
  • Leon Max Lederman, US, for the neutrino beam method and the demonstration of the doublet structure of the leptons through the discovery of the muon neutrino
  • David Lee, US,
  • Gabriel Lippmann, France, for his method of reproducing colours photographically based on the phenomenon of interference
  • Albert Abraham Michelson, US, for his optical precision instruments and the spectroscopic and metrological investigations carried out with their aid
  • Ben Roy Mottelson, US and Denmark,for the discovery of the connection between collective motion and particle motion in atomic nuclei and the development of the theory of the structure of the atomic nucleus based on this connection
  • Douglas Osheroff, US, (Jewish father)
  • Wolfgang Pauli, (one non-Jewish grandparent)
  • Arno Allan Penzias, US, for their discovery of cosmic microwave background radiation
  • Martin Lewis Perl, for the discovery of the tau lepton
  • David Politzer, US, for the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction
  • Isidor Isaac Rabi, US, for his resonance method for recording the magnetic properties of atomic nuclei
  • Frederick Reines, US,
  • Burton Richter, US, for their pioneering work in the discovery of a heavy elementary particle of a new kind
  • Arthur Schawlow, US, (Jewish father)
  • Melvin Schwartz, US, for the neutrino beam method and the demonstration of the doublet structure of the leptons through the discovery of the muon neutrino
  • Julian Schwinger, US, for his work on quantum electrodynamics
  • Emilio Segrè, Italy and US, for discovery of antiproton
  • Jack Steinberger, US, for the neutrino beam method and the demonstration of the doublet structure of the leptons through the discovery of the muon neutrino
  • Otto Stern, US, for his contribution to the development of the molecular ray method and his discovery of the magnetic moment of the proton
  • Steven Weinberg, US, for their contributions to the theory of the unified weak and electromagnetic interaction between elementary particles, including, inter alia, the prediction of the weak neutral current
  • Eugene Wigner, US, Nuclear Engineering

Chemienobelpreis

  • Sidney Altman, Canada, discovery of catalytic properties of RNA
  • Christian Anfinsen, US, work on ribonuclease, especially concerning the connection between the amino acid sequence and the biologically active conformation (convert)
  • Adolf von Baeyer, Germany, for services in the advancement of organic chemistry and the chemical industry, through his work on organic dyes and hydroaromatic compounds (Jewish mother)
  • Paul Berg, US, for his fundamental studies of the biochemistry of nucleic acids, with particular regard to recombinant-DNA
  • Herbert Brown, Ukraine, development of the use of boron- and phosphorus-containing compounds, respectively, into important reagents in organic synthesis
  • Melvin Calvin, US, research on the carbon dioxide assimilation in plants
  • Aaron Ciechanover, Israel, 2004, for the discovery of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation
  • Walter Gilbert, US, contributions concerning the determination of base sequences in nucleic acids
  • Fritz Haber, Germany, for the synthesis of ammonia from its elements (converted to Christianity)
  • Herbert Hauptman, US, development of direct methods for the determination of crystal structures
  • Alan Heeger, US, for the discovery and development of conductive polymers
  • Avram Hershko, Israel, 2004, for the discovery of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation
  • George de Hevesy, Hungary, the use of isotopes as tracers in the study of chemical processes
  • Roald Hoffmann (1937 - ) American, for theories, developed independently, concerning the course of chemical reactions (1981)[2]
  • Jerome Karle, US, development of direct methods for the determination of crystal structures
  • Aaron Klug, Lithuania, development of crystallographic electron microscopy and his structural elucidation of biologically important nucleic acid-protein complexes
  • Walter Kohn, Austria, for his development of the density-functional theory
  • Roger Kornberg, US, for his studies of the molecular basis of eukaryotic transcription
  • Harold Kroto, UK, (Jewish father)
  • Rudolph Marcus, Canada, contributions to the theory of electron transfer reactions in chemical systems
  • Henri Moissan, France, for investigation and isolation of the element fluorine, and for the adoption in the service of science of the electric furnace called after him (Jewish mother)
  • [citation needed]George Olah, Hungary, for his contribution to carbocation chemistry (unconfirmed)
  • Max Perutz, Austria, studies of the structures of globular proteins
  • John Polanyi, German-born British Canadian chemist, (1986), (Jewish father),
  • Viscount Ilya Prigogine, Belgium, contributions to non-equilibrium thermodynamics, particularly the theory of dissipative structures
  • Irwin Rose, US, for the discovery of ubiquitin -mediated protein degradation
  • William Stein, US, contribution to the understanding of the connection between chemical structure and catalytic activity of the active center of the ribonuclease molecule
  • Otto Wallach, Germany, pioneer work in the field of alicyclic compounds
  • Richard Willstatter, Germany, for his researches on plant pigments, especially chlorophyll

Medizinnobelpreis

  • Richard Axel, US, discoveries concerning the celular and molecular organization of the olfactory system.
  • Julius Axelrod, US, discoveries concerning the humoral transmitters in the nerve terminals and the mechanism for their storage, release and inactivation
  • David Baltimore, US, discoveries concerning the interaction between tumor viruses and the genetic material of the cell
  • Robert Bárány, Austria and later Sweden,
  • Baruj Benacerraf, Venezuela, discoveries concerning genetically determined structures on the cell surface that regulate immunological reactions
  • Konrad Bloch, Germany, discoveries concerning the mechanism and regulation of the cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism
  • Baruch Blumberg, US, discoveries concerning new mechanisms for the origin and dissemination of infectious diseases
  • Sydney Brenner, South Africa, discoveries concerning genetic regulation of organ development and programmed cell death
  • Michael Brown, US, discoveries concerning the regulation of cholesterol metabolism
  • Ernst Chain, Germany, discovery of penicillin and its curative effect in various infectious diseases
  • Stanley Cohen, US, discoveries of growth factors
  • Gerty Cori, US (born in Prague), discovery of the course of the catalytic conversion of glycogen (born Jewish but converted to Catholicism when she married)
  • Gerald Edelman, US, discoveries concerning the chemical structure of antibodies
  • Paul Ehrlich, Germany, for work on immunity
  • Gertrude Elion, US, discoveries of important principles for drug treatment
  • Joseph Erlanger, US, for discoveries relating to the highly differentiated functions of single nerve fibers
  • Andrew Fire
  • Edmond H. Fischer, US, (Jewish father)
  • Robert Furchgott, US, discoveries concerning nitric oxide as a signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system
  • Herbert Gasser, US, (Jewish father)
  • Alfred Gilman, US, discovery of G-proteins and the role of these proteins in signal transduction in cells
  • Joseph Goldstein, US, discoveries concerning the regulation of cholesterol metabolism
  • Paul Greengard, US, for signal transduction in the nervous system
  • Robert Horvitz, US, discoveries concerning genetic regulation of organ development and programmed cell death
  • Francois Jacob, France, discoveries concerning genetic control of enzyme and virus synthesis
  • Eric Kandel, Austria, for signal transduction in the nervous system
  • Bernard Katz, Germany, discoveries concerning the humoral transmitters in the nerve terminals and the mechanism for their storage, release and inactivation
  • Arthur Kornberg, US, discovery of the mechanisms in the biological synthesis of ribonucleic acid and deoxyribonucleic acid
  • Hans Adolf Krebs, Germany, discovery of the citric acid cycle
  • Karl Landsteiner, Austria, for discovery of human blood groups
  • Joshua Lederberg, US, discovered genetic recombination and the organization of the genetic material of bacteria
  • Rita Levi-Montalcini, Italy, discoveries of growth factors
  • Fritz Lipmann, Germany, discovery of co-enzyme A and its importance for intermediary metabolism
  • Otto Loewi, Austria, for discoveries relating to chemical transmission of nerve impulses
  • Salvador Luria, Italy, discoveries concerning the replication mechanism and the genetic structure of viruses
  • Andre Lwoff, France, discoveries concerning genetic control of enzyme and virus synthesis
  • Ilya Ilyich Mechnikov, France, (Jewish mother)
  • Otto Meyerhof, Germany, for discovery of the relationship between consumption of oxygen and the metabolism of lactic acid in the muscle
  • Cesar Milstein, Argentina, theories concerning the specificity in development and control of the immune system and the discovery of the principle for production of monoclonal antibodies
  • Hermann Muller, US, discovery of the production of mutations by means of X-ray irradiation (Jewish mother)
  • Daniel Nathans, US, discovery of restriction enzymes and their application to problems of molecular genetics
  • Marshall Nirenberg, US, interpretation of the genetic code and its function in protein synthesis
  • Stanley Prusiner, US, discovery of Prions - a new biological principle of infection
  • Tadeus Reichstein, Poland, discoveries relating to the hormones of the adrenal cortex, their structure and biological effects
  • Martin Rodbell, US, discovery of G-proteins and the role of these proteins in signal transduction in cells
  • Andrew Schally, Lithuania, discoveries concerning the peptide hormone production of the brain
  • Howard Temin, US, discoveries concerning the interaction between tumor viruses and the genetic material of the cell
  • John Vane, UK, (Jewish father)
  • Harold Varmus, US, discovery of the cellular origin of retroviral oncogenes
  • Selman Waksman, Russia, discovery of streptomycin, the first antibiotic effective against tuberculosis
  • George Wald, US, discoveries concerning the primary physiological and chemical visual processes in the eye
  • Otto Warburg, Germany, (Jewish father)
  • Rosalyn Yalow, US, for the development of radioimmunoassays of peptide hormones

Nobelpreis für Wirtschaftswissenschaften

Literaturnobelpreis

Friedensnobelpreis

 
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